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Feeling stuck? Have writer’s block? Get some ideas for your tarot related blog here!

Why specifically 108 Blog Post Ideas for Tarot Bloggers? The number is fodder for a different post! For now, though, I want you to know that even the most prolific writer gets a bout of writer’s block from time to time—so don’t get upset with yourself if you sit down in front of your computer and come up with… ummm…. hmmmm… what should I write about today? It’s totally normal.

These writing prompts can get your creative juices flowing so that you can publish a blog post every week of the year (or more!). I’m going to give you 108 tarot themed writing prompts and blog post ideas for you to use! You can use this to plan out 2 YEARS of content for your tarot themed blog if you so desire…

Writing Prompts for Tarot Readers and Bloggers

1-78) The Tarot Cards, themselves. You can give keywords for the cards or treat each card as if it was not only the first time you’ve seen it but also the 4,000th time.

Don’t forget that you can get back to writing about the absolute basics in your blog. 

79) Cards that stick out. For example, the Mary El tarot has a very interesting version of the 4 of Swords that is a bit different than a standard Rider-Waite visual. Pick out those cards that stick out to you and write about how they broadened your understanding of tarot or of a reading.

80) Your favorite deck type. Are you a fan of Rider-Waite, Thoth, or Tarot de Marseille? Write about your favorite deck type and why you love it.

81) Your favorite deck. What is your favorite deck and why? Choose a couple of cards to highlight your why.

82) Your least favorite deck. Did you get a deck you just can’t connect with or one that the artwork turns you off of? Tell your audience about it! Bonus: Auction it off on Instagram or Facebook.

83) How you “got it”. There are some cards and combinations that are difficult for people to understand. For example, many people have issues with the court cards. If you have a great system you used to gain clarity or insight when reading, share it.

84) Rituals. Do you have any distinct rituals you use for connecting with your deck, cleansing it, reading preparation, ending a reading, moon cycles, holidays and high celebrations? You might be able to plan a blog post for your overall reading ritual and then one for the different times of the year.

85) Deck reviews. You can do this with old decks that have been in your collection since the dawn of time or the latest greatest decks on the market.

86) The story of your introduction to tarot. What was your first reading like? Did you have any childhood or teenage experiences that led you to pursue working with tarot?

87) Lore and myth. Explore different “old wives’ tales” and myths about tarot, like reading for yourself, being gifted your first (and subsequent) deck(s), “tarot is evil,” etc.

88) Special spreads. Do you love to create spreads or do you have a twist on the interpretations in classic spreads? Or you can go totally old school and explain commonly used spreads.

This is my go-to spread for general readings:

89) Daily draws. I have to admit that daily draws are my least favorite of the bunch unless they have something spectacular included in them.

90) Talk about other tarot readers you admire. There are so many fabulous tarot readers and authors, artists and icons out there. Pick one you admire and explore that person’s world and work, explaining why you like it.

91) Tarot + spirituality. Some readers read tarot solely and don’t have a spiritual practice as a foundation. For others, tarot is one tool in a toolbox of different practices and modalities.

92) Tarot + psychology. There are those in the tarot community who are counselors, psychologists, and therapists. If you are someone with a more academic background, share how that background influences your work with tarot and interaction with clients. Perhaps even give some advice, guidance, or resources for newbie pro readers who need to refer a client to a more psychologically based reader or to a therapist.

93) I’d never… Create a list of 10 things that you’d never do when reading tarot or that you’d try to avoid at all costs.

94) Your favorite tarot books. This is great for a “Top 3, Top 5, or Top 10” list.

95) Your reading style. I’m off the hip, honest, and a bit pragmatic when it comes to tarot readings. My style brings a lot of life coaching into the mix, along with any channeled messages I receive. I don’t sugarcoat, but I have tact. Some people have a different style: more academic, a touch of Kabbalah, gentle messages, full-on intuitive… every single one of us has a different way of reading and communicating the messages we receive. Talk about yours.

96) Conferences and conventions you’ve gone to or would like to go to. Usually, one convention can lead to quite a few posts, if you consider lead up excitement, being at the convention, who you meet, what you learn, what swag you buy or get for free…

97) Symbolism. Tarot is practically filled to the brim with symbolism, aside from the Elemental roots of the Minor Arcana. Talk about important symbols in tarot and what they mean to you.

98) Your own Fool’s Journey. If you feel like you’ve experienced a journey akin to the Fool’s Journey, then talk about the steps you took and what you learned along the way.

99) Major Arcana versus full deck readings. Do you do readings with only the Majors from time to time? If so, what is your experience with working with them as the entire deck?

100) Reading add-ons. Do you ever bring other fortune telling tools into your readings? If so, which and give some advice about how to use them or to pair them with your tarot card reading.

101) Adding decks. Do you have a special way that you add oracle decks, regular playing cards, Lenormand decks, or even multiple tarot decks to a reading? Tell us about it!

102) Reversals. Do you use them? Do you love them or hate them? What do you think?

103) Best questions/worst questions. As we all know, there are ways to phrase a question for tarot and ways to avoid. Go into your ideas about what you recommend and what to avoid.

104) Tarot swag and tats. Do you have (or covet) a really cool tarot poster, mug, or vintage lamp? Tell your readers about it. Got a great tarot tattoo (or have you seen some you’d like)? Share that as well!

105) Your reading space. Do you have a cool space that you use to read tarot for yourself and clients? Show it off! Tell people about the different parts of it, especially if you have something unique.

106) Tarot pets. Do your pets get involved in your readings? I know there are quite a few kitties out there who love to lay smack dab in the middle of a reading. Is your dog or cat a tarot energy lover? Also, people just love animals, so you could talk about your pets in a post.

My doggies make me feel like a real life Chariot driver when I am walking them! I have one old, black, gentle female dog and one rambunctious, energetic, aggressive and “typically male” little white dog. When I walk them both at the same time, I feel like I am in the Chariot card.

107) The Elements. Earth, Fire, Water, Air – what do the Elements symbolize for you and how do you integrate that into your tarot readings?

108) Everything else in your life. Each and every one of us is a unique and interesting person with his or her own experiences and ways of seeing the world. Your life, itself, is something to write about. People will connect with you because of your quirks and oddities, as well as the trials and even the boring stuff you have going on in your life.

These 108 writing prompts for tarot readers should keep you busy writing for a while, or at least help you plan for your next year’s worth of tarot-related blog posts.

Do you have any topics you would add to the list? Feel free to add them to the comments below!