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Firing a client is a really scary thought to many of us sensitive and spiritual entrepreneurs. We are here to serve. We’ve been called upon to help others with our work. We rely on our clients for our financial well-being. But really, we can’t expect others to heal themselves and stand up for their best interests if we, ourselves, are not. There are times when we need to fire a client.

1) Rude or abusive behavior. Lord knows we don’t need to cater to anyone who treats us like poo. For some reason, there are those clients – especially when working on chat lines – who are abusive to the people they are turning to for help.

Abusive behavior can be anything from comments on your race or background to demanding that you read for free to making unwanted, explicit comments toward you. If a client makes you feel uncomfortable, then you have every right to let that person go. Standing your ground might feel a little bit uncomfortable, but that momentary discomfort is far better than continuing to put up with a person’s abusive words.

2) Not valuing your time and services. Clients who show up late, pay on their own schedule (not yours), or expect you to drop everything to cater to their needs are clients you should fire. Ultimately, people who aren’t valuing your time and energy won’t value the services or advice that you give them. Of course, if the person is doing what it takes to work out a payment schedule or is willing to wait for an appointment (or your time), that is one thing. Continuing to make demands on your time while having outstanding invoices or trying to push their projects to the front of your to-do list is quite another. See how the client makes you feel and go with your gut.

3) You’re not a good fit. This is one of the harder reasons to fire a client, or to pass on that client in the first place, but it is totally important to really be honest with yourself and the people you work for. If you can’t help a person, then you can’t help them – and it’d be better to refer someone who could help rather than hanging on and muddling through and hoping.

It’s like this: if your client needs a manicure and goes to a hairstylist and asks for a manicure. Sure, she’d likely get a manicure – maybe even a nice polish change and some cuticle cream. But a nail technician would be the better fit for the job and would likely do a much better, more thorough job.

This was one thing that I struggled with at the beginning of my career. I wanted to be a reader, healer, and business mentor for everyone who came knocking. As time progressed, though, I realized that my gifts were in helping newbie business owners, helping polish writing, and doing some totally honest readings for those who wanted to hear the truth and make transformative changes in their lives. Believe me, this net doesn’t catch everyone out there – not all of the spiritual business community or all of the people who need an editor or a tarot reading. But, it describes those I can help the most. And honestly, it’s best if I pass on or refer those who need something other than what I offer.

As you know, your time and energy are important to conserve and protect – especially if you are a sensitive or spiritual business person. Cutting clients who just aren’t a good fit is one of the best ways to ensure that you have enough energy (and avoid frustrations and negativity) so that you can do your best work.

What do you think about firing clients? Have you ever had to fire a client before? Feel free to leave a comment about either keeping a client who wasn’t a great fit or freeing yourself from a client who wasn’t.